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Aristotle was a great Greek philosopher that is recognized by many

He is known as a writer who covered numerous subjects that included poetry, physics and literature. However, he is better remembered for his moral virtues writings. Aristotle’s moral value is his own ethical view. It includes the human behavior, as he explains the way people should behave and handle issues. Arguably, good morals lead to living in piece with other people, since there would be no collisions among individuals and this is what he wishes for. According to him, virtue and ethics are rather practical subjects than theoretical. He supports this idea with an example of an eye, saying that an eye is only of benefit if it can see, simply because the only work of an eye is to see. This paper discusses the moral virtues as noted by Aristotle. Furthermore, it explains why some of the moral virtues are acceptable while others might not be applicable and still debatable.

Aristotle maintains the assumption that moral virtues are the behavioral ways placed amid extremes of surplus as well as insufficiency. According to Aristotle, moral virtues are to be differentiated from logical qualities. This means that the moral virtue has to do with emotion, decisions, and appropriate actions. Contrary to that, logical virtue is regarded as a kind of knowledge gained by education.  Regarding that, the main interest here is in moral virtue. In maintaining that moral virtues are behavioral ways, Aristotle tries to explain what types of things virtues are, showing that not every behavioral way is a virtue. There are numerous behavioral ways that are vices.  Aristotle's assertion that virtues fall amid two boundaries, sometimes referred to as 'the principle of the mean', is anticipated to enable people to recognize which behavioral ways are the virtuous ones.

Additionally, it is generally understood that virtues belong to the spirit

Aristotle's knowledge concerning the spirit approximates to human perception of the brain. Moreover, the understanding of the spirit is not knowledge of some non-material stuff that subsists independently of human body. According to Aristotle's explanation, the spirit has three different kinds of components: passions, faculties, and people’s behavioral ways.  The human being’s passions include feelings, needs, doubts, ambitions and many more. The human faculties are the normal abilities to feel and respond in the diverse habits that they have. The behavioral way can be described as the way a person acts and feels in a certain situation. With this knowledge of what the spirit is comprised of, moral virtue has to be recognized as one of these three components.

Arguably, Aristotle affirms that virtues cannot be passions

Aristotle claims that we are neither praised nor blamed for our feelings; instead, we are either praised or blamed for our virtues. Notably, people are not praised or blamed for their feelings, since they occur more or less against your will in response to the way things happen at a certain time (Ross 54).  Additionally, Aristotle's motive for refuting that virtues are faculties is related to this statement.  A fraction of person’s faculties consist of their capability to become angry. This implies that we should neither praise nor make people responsible for having the aptitude to get angry. People praise others for what they do to manifest their ability to become angry only when the state of affairs calls for it. Regarding that, virtues are not to be recognized with our capacities. For that reason, virtues have to be ways of behavior.

Furthermore, Aristotle asserts that not all ways of personality are accepted

Lustfulness, for example, is a way of personality. Notably, it is a tendency to experience the urge to have sex and constantly look for sexual pleasures.  This behavioral way is not a virtuous one, since it does not have a positive outcome. After reaching the conclusion that virtues are the character traits, Aristotle's explanation of moral virtue remains partial, until he clarifies which character traits are the virtues. He only explains the states of value that are not virtues, but not those that are virtues. Here Aristotle appeals to his principle of the mean. The virtues are the ways of personality that lie amid excess and insufficiency.  The virtuous personality state is a tendency to feel and react to circumstances in a suitable way and to the right extent. This means that when a person has an urge to do a certain thing, they should locate a form of response that would be positive. If their response is negative, that is not a virtue. This is a conflict between overreacting on the one hand or underreacting on the other.

Considering the case of lustfulness, lust cannot be a virtue because it is an excessive sexual desire that makes people react to it too haphazardly. If a person has the urge to have sex and responds to it in a proper manner, then that is a virtue. However, lust lies at the extreme of excess.  The other extreme of the personality state is frostiness, as it sometimes referred to, which means a tendency to feel too little sexual desire or not to respond to it.  According to Aristotle, the sexual virtue falls amid these extremes.  Sexual virtue means having emotion and responding to sexual desire in the right situations and to the right extent. Aristotle's principle of the mean does not explain the reason why situations depend on the scale of fervor with reverence to sexual virtue or supplementary virtues.  But, as Aristotle observations approach the commencement of his argument of virtue and its fine line, "the debate will be sufficient if it has as a great deal of clarity as the subject matter confesses of."  An additional investigation into the nature of definite virtues would engage a more comprehensive discussion of what scale of fervor or action is suitable in what situation.

In conclusion, Aristotle maintains the assumption that moral virtues are the behavioral ways placed amid extremes of surplus and insufficiency. According to Aristotle, moral virtues are to be differentiated from logical qualities. This means that the moral virtue has to do with emotions, decisions, and appropriate actions. Additionally, it is generally understood that virtues belong to the spirit.  Aristotle affirms that virtues cannot be passions. He claims that people are neither praised nor blamed for their feelings; instead, they are either praised or blamed for their virtues. The virtues are those qualities of personality that lie amid excess and insufficiency.

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